This site will shortly cease to be to be replaced by: www.lugnad.ie Please update any links you created

Blog Archives

M.V. Plassy

Plassy

The Plassy is the wreck shown in the opening sequence of Fr Ted. Behind it is a real story of a heroic rescue.

Posted in Ships

Irish Poplar

The Irish Poplar was the first ship acquired by Irish Shipping Ltd. She imported white wheat flour.

Posted in Ships

The Vasa, 50 years later

2011 is the fiftieth anniversary of the successful raising of the almost intact early seventeenth- century Swedish warship Vasa from the mud at the bottom of Stockholm Harbour. It represents one of the greatest maritime archaeological recoveries ever carried out. After the salvage of the ship in 1961, it was conserved and restored and can be seen in a specially built museum where it has attracted millions of visitors over the years.

Posted in Ships

Amity (1701) The Dunworley Slave Ship

The history of slavery is probably as old as that of mankind itself. Hundreds of thousands of slaves built such classical civilisations as Greece, Egypt and Rome. Viking Dublin was a major slave trading port in its heyday. However, for the purposes of this story I will deal only with the transatlantic slave trade whereby from twelve to twenty million African slaves were transported to the Americas over a span of four hundred years.

Posted in Ships

Crescent City

Mexican Silver Dollars at Galley Head, recovered from the cargo of the Crescent City

Posted in Ships

M.V. Kilkenny by Austin Gill

ID photo of Austin Gill

An account of the events of the night of 21st November 1991 Austin Gill, A.B., M.V. Kilkenny. The events of that night are still very vivid in my mind after more than 20 years although I often forget things that

Posted in Ships

Fethard Lifeboat Disaster.

need to transcribe ?

Posted in Ships

The Mystery of the Titanic

The Mystery of the Titanic

She was the largest ship in the world at the time
She was proclaimed unsinkable
She collided with an iceberg and sank on her maiden voyage.

Posted in Ships

SS Lochgarry

History of the SS Lochgarry
One of Ireland’s most Popular Recreational Diving Wrecks

Posted in Ships

Demeray

“The two barren islets are best remembered as the scene of the several shipwrecks. Here in 1819 the Demerary carrying gold bullion was wrecked and sank. One of her passengers, a Scotsman named Hugh Monro Robertson and sixteen members of the crew were washed ashore at Cullenstown and buried in the ancient graveyard in the Cill Park near Cullenstown Castle. Monroe’s is the only tombstone there now as one of the pillars from the memorial over the sailors’ grave was used as a weight on a harrow by a local farmer. To this day it is said that traces of gold dust from the Demerary’s strong room are found on the sand of the Keeraghs”

Posted in Ships

Morven Disaster. December, 1906.

The Morven was bound from Portland, Oregon to Liverpool with a cargo of about three thousand tons of grain for the Messrs Bannatyne. The place where the wreck occurred is a little promontory locally known as “Horse Island”.

Posted in Ships

M.V. Plassy

Plassy

The Plassy is the wreck shown in the opening sequence of Fr Ted. Behind it is a real story of a heroic rescue.

Posted in Ships

The Wreck of the Bolivar

The Country had been in the grip of freezing conditions for the entire month of February 1947 with snowstorms, and accompanying snowdrifts, which blanketed the countryside and made all movement extremely difficult. Power failures were frequent and added to the general misery. It was against this background that the M.V.BOLIVAR was making her way across the Irish Sea on the morning of Tuesday, March 4th, bound for Dublin Port with a badly needed cargo of grain and other essential items. Like many another fine ship before her, although Dublin Bay was in sight, the BOLIVAR would never reach that port and would leave her bones in the sands of that treacherous graveyard of ships that spans the entrance to Dublin Bay waiting to ensnare the unwary, the Kish Bank.

Posted in Ships
Testing … Testing
this site is not live - yet The new one!