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Dennis Collins – The One-Legged Sailor & the King

At a time when the death penalty was a hot topic, Dennis Collins justifiably protested, to attract the King’s attention, he threw a pebble. That was, legally speaking, high treason, requiring the death penalty. Read the details and consequences here

Posted in People

M.V. Plassy

Plassy

The Plassy is the wreck shown in the opening sequence of Fr Ted. Behind it is a real story of a heroic rescue.

Posted in Ships

Irish Shipping Ltd. A Fleet History

A new book! Irish Shipping Ltd. A Fleet History for more details, contact http://www.facebook.com/rosslaremaritime.enthusiasts

Posted in news

Irish Poplar

The Irish Poplar was the first ship acquired by Irish Shipping Ltd. She imported white wheat flour.

Posted in Ships

Remember City of Waterford (convoy OG74)

S.S. CITY OF WATERFORD S.S. CITY OF WATERFORD Aplin, Thomas E., Dublin Furlong, George, Wexford Naylor, Samuel, Bray, Co. Wicklow Murphy, P., Dun Laoghaire Kearney, Edward, Dublin were killed as a result of the Walmer Castle being bombed by German

Posted in Remember

Remember Cymric

SCHOONER CYMRIC Bergin, Philip, Wexford Brennan, James, Wexford Cassedy, Christopher, Athboy, Co. Meath Crosbie, James, Wexford Furlong, Kevin, Wexford Kieran, Bernard, Dundalk McConnell, Cecil,Dublin O’Rourke, William, Wexford Ryan, Michael, Dungarvan Seaver, Peter, Skerries, Co. Dublin Tierney, Michael, Wexford

Posted in Remember

Remember SS St Fintan

S.S. St. FINTAN S.S. St. FINTAN Friitzen Carl, Dublin Hendy, Neil, Isle of Arran, Scotland Howat, James, Paisley, Scotland Jones, Joseph, Dublin Leonard, Matthew, Rush, Co.Dublin O’Beirne, Diarmuid, Dublin O’Brien, William, Dublin O’Donnell, M., Ringsend, Dublink Plunkett, B., Dublin

Posted in Remember

Remember Innisfallen

M.V. INNISFALLEN MII – M.V. INNISFALLEN Doyle, W., Dublin Geary, Daniel, Kinsale Porter, James, Dublin Rickard, Joseph., Howth and three wounded

Posted in Remember

Remember Kerry Head

S.S. KERRY HEAD Begley, Thomas, Limerick Naughton, George, Limerick Byrne, Dick, Wicklow Naughton, James, Limerick Davidson, William, Carrickfergus Nicholl, George, Carrickfergus Drummond, Charles, Blackpool O’Neill, Patrick, Limerick McMahon, Michael, Scattery Island, Co. Clare Tobin, John, Limerick McMahon, Stephen, Scattery Island,

Posted in Remember

Remember SS Meath

S.S. MEATH

Posted in Remember

Remember: Naomh Garbhan

Fishing Boat – NAOMH GARBHAN sorry, no illustration MII – Fishing Boat – NAOMH GARBHAN Mined and sunk of Waterford coast, 2nd May 1945 Cuddihy, Nicholas , Helvick, Waterford Griffin, John, (Senior)Helvick, Waterford Griffin, John, (Junior)Helvick, Waterford

Posted in Remember

Remember City of Bremen

SS City of Bremen At 6pm on 2 June 1940, The City of Bremen (Saorstait and Continental Lines) was transporting grain from Lisbon to Dublin when she was bombed by a Junkers 88 bomber and sunk. The crew were rescued

Posted in Remember

Remember City of Limerick

S.S. CITY OF LIMERICK S.S. CITY OF LIMERICK Brennan, Hugh, Clontarf, Dublin Sullivan, John, Liverpool

Posted in Remember

Remember Ardmore

SS Ardmore MII – S.S. ARDMORE Barry, Frank, Passage West, Co. Cork Hare, Thomas Edwin, Dublin O’Regan, James, Cork Bruland, Edward, Passage West, Co. Cork Johnson, A., Liverpool O’Shea, Frank, Cork Cronin, James, Cork Kelleher, John, Cork Power, John, Cork

Posted in Remember

Remember – Luimneach

S.S. LUIMNEACH Able Seaman M Carrol died later of pneumonia On 4 Sep, 1940, the unescorted and neutral Luimneach (Master Eric Septimus Jones) was stopped by U-46 with two shots across her bow west-southwest of the Scilly Isles and was

Posted in Remember

Remember Kyleclare

S.S. KYLECLARE Barry, Edward, Wexford Morgan, John, Dublin Brannock, Patrick, Dublin Mooney, Daniel, Dublin Brady, Thomas, Galway O’Brien, L., Dublin deBurca, Diarmuid, Dublin O’Brien, Richard, Dublin Grimes, Richard, Dublin O’Brien, Daniel, Dublin Hamilton, A.R., Galway O’Neill, P., Dublin Hopkins, Philip,

Posted in Remember

Remember Irish Oak

S.S. IRISH OAK Sunk by U-Boat U-607 in North Atlantic, 15th May 1943 Crew rescued by S.S. IRISH PLANE

Posted in Remember

Remember Irish Pine

Read the wikipedia article Bent, Patrick, Wexford Dooley, Maurice, Limerick O’Connor, Joseph, Dublin Cashin, Kevin, Dublin Duffy, Joseph, Dublin O’Donoghue, Thomas, Dublin Clery, Patrick, Wexford Fanning, Peter, Clogherhead, Co. Louth O’Neill, Matthew, Wexford Connolly, William, Kinsale Flynn, Michael, Limerick Ryan,

Posted in Remember

Remember Clonlara (convoy OG71)

Sunk by torpedo from U-564 in North Atlantic, 22nd August 1941, convoy OG 71 The CLONARA had rescued thirteen men from the ALVA HMS CAMPION rescued thirteen survivors from the CLONARA (five from the ALVA and eight from the CLONARA)

Posted in Remember

Remember Munster

Mined and sunk in the Irish Sea – 2nd February 1940 five wounded, one died later The first Irish ship to be sunk in World War Two was the passenger ship Munster, which fell victim to a mine in Liverpool

Posted in Remember

Remember ST Leukos

Sunk with all 11 hands by gunfire from U-38 (Liebe) – NW Tory Island – 9th March 1940 The Leukos was fishing in the company of British trawlers and she may have positioned herself between these fleeing trawlers and the

Posted in Remember

Remember ILV Isolda

Sunk by aircraft off Waterford coast, 19th December 1940 Dunne, P.,12 Sallynoggin Villa, Dun Laoghaire, aged 45. Farrell, W., Seaman; Dun Laoghaire Hayden, J.J., Fireman; Beaufort House, Dun Laoghaire, aged 37. Holland, William, Steward; 7 Sussex Street, Dun Laoghaire, aged

Posted in Remember

U-35 in Dingle

at Ballymore, three miles west of Dingle, 4 October 1939, U-35 landed 28 Greek sailors

Posted in Stories

Irish WWII Losses

How Ireland’s Mercantile Marine fared during WWII by Frank Forde, author of ‘The Long Watch’, the standard work on this subject

Posted in War

The First World War at sea off West Cork

The ferocity of the First World War evokes names like the Somme, Verdun, Paschendale and Mons and maybe Jutland or Coronel. It may therefore be a surprise to realise that the First World War equivalent of the battle of the Atlantic was fought vigorously of the Coast of West Cork. That such a significant front is all but forgotten is no surprise because the Irish rarely turned their eyes seaward except to judge the weather for agriculture.

Posted in War

HMS A5 (Forgotten Submariners) Lost at Cobh

Early in 1999, Chief Petty Officer Owen O’Keeffe of the Irish Naval Service was visiting Old Church Cemetery near Cobh, County Cork. The purpose of his visit was to do some research on U S Navy graves dating back to the First World War. In the course of his search for the American graves, Owen O’Keeffe came across five particular graves which had like headstones. The graves were very neglected and overgrown and the headstones which were in the form of crosses were moss covered.

Posted in War

The Flanders Flotilla and U-Boat Alley

The repeated claims that America declared against Germany during WW1 because her citizens and ships had been attacked by German U-boats is not accurate. Though the U-boats were restrained as a result of American diplomatic protests, America did not enter the war at that time and when they did, it was for different reasons. This has not been the first nor the last time that war was pursued for reasons that were not stated. This type of media management has of course reached heights of a totally new sophistication today.

Posted in War

LOP 6 Howth Head

Firstly I’d like to look at Howth Head LOP in the general context of the Coast Watching Service and talk about what the service was and how the Howth post operated within that structure. Then I’d like to focus on the post in day-to-day operation during a particular period of the Second World War, a period usually ignored by historians of the Battle of the Atlantic.

Posted in War

G2, the coast-watching service and the Battle of the Atlantic

This paper is an early version of the introduction to the Guarding Neutral Ireland:
the coastwatching service and military intelligence 1939-45 (Four Courts Press, 2008)

Posted in War

Early Irish Free State Naval Activity

Eddie Bourke Dainty The early years of the Irish Free State from January 1922 were a time of turmoil after the war of Independence ceased with the Truce in July 1921. The British army commenced their withdrawal and the Free

Posted in War

Where are the Barges?

Midsummer’s Day 1961 saw the last commercial passage of a Guinness barge on the River Liffey. According to Al Byrne in his most entertaining book “Guinness Times – My Days in the World’s Most Famous Brewery” it was 6 p.m. when the 80-foot long by 17-foot-one inch-wide barge, Castleknock, sailed from the Custom House with a load of empties and slowly made its funereal way up river to the jetty at St. James’s Gate.

Posted in Stories

Hobblers

More than seven decades after their dangerous enterprise came to an end Dun Laoghaire families with close links to the sea gathered in late September to honour the hobblers.

“The who? ” asked one local teenager when told by a friend that he intended to be present at the dedication in Dun Laoghaire harbour of a compelling monument to the men who years ago guided ships to harbour before the arrival of the Dublin Port pilots.

Posted in People

The Boyd Disaster

February 1861 will be remembered not only for the loss of a great many ships around Dublin Bay but also for the death of a heroic man, who, with some of his companions, attempted to save the lives of some members of shipwrecked crews in Kingstown. This was Captain John McNeil Boyd of the guard-ship H. M. S. AJAX.

Posted in People

Simon Bolivar

One thousand men of the Irish Legion landed on Venezuela’s Margarita Island in August 1819, after a 4,500-mile sea voyage from Dublin. These soldiers of fortune, many of them recently demobilized veterans of the Napoleonic Wars, now sought fame and adventure in the armies of South America’s Liberator, Simon Bolivar. In the years 1819 and 1820, more than 2,100 Irish soldiers reached Venezuela as members of organized Irish regiments.

Posted in People

John Richardson Wigham

A great inventor and businessman. Actually born in Scotland, he was accused of being Irish, which he never denied. When he was 15 years old he left Scotland for Dublin to start his apprenticeship. Despite prejudice he was very successful

Posted in People

John DeLap

Irish Seamen John Delap Apparently born in Kerry most of what we know about Delap comes from Royal Navy and Russian navy records. In September 1714, Delap came to the notice of Peter the Great when he was aboard Peter

Posted in People

Robert Gibbings, Underwater Artist

Robert Gibbings, An Irish Artist Underwater By Cormac F. LowthFirst published in SUBSEA, the quarterly journal of the Irish Underwater Council, Autumn 2007. Nowadays we tend to take the imagery produced underwater, mostly by digital photography, very much for granted.

Posted in People

John Philip Holland (Submarines)

need to check

Posted in People

Francis Beaufort (Wind Scale)

Francis Beaufort

We are all used to hearing weather forecasts on radio or television predicting ‘Wind Force So-and- So’. How many realise that the inventor of the Wind-Scale was born and brought up in Ireland, and did here some of the scientific experiments which place him among the greatest contributors anywhere at any time to the development of the marine sciences?

Posted in People

Mutiny & Murder on the Earl of Sandwich

Peter Brady will deliver a lecture entitled:

Mutiny & Murder on the Earl of Sandwich

on Thursday 21st November 2013 at 8:00 pm

in the Stella Maris Seafarers’ Club

Posted in Lecture, news

Italian Salvage Ships ai the Galley Head

Paddy O’Sullivan traces the history of the Italian salvage company, Sorima, and describes its successful Ludgate operation off the Galley Head in 1934-35   On 19 May 1922, the ageing P&O liner, Egypt, departed from Tilbury, bound for Marseille and

Posted in Engineering

MV Kerlogue

Irish ships were neutral during the war. The Kerlogue story is interesting as she was attacked by both sides and she rescued both sides

Posted in War

Rochdale and Prince of Wales

These troop ships were lost on their way to the Napoleonic Wars. Over 400 bodies washed up on an urban shore. Allegations that they were trapped below while the crew escaped. This sad incident was an impetus to the construction of Dún Laoghaire Harbour

Posted in War

The Vasa, 50 years later

2011 is the fiftieth anniversary of the successful raising of the almost intact early seventeenth- century Swedish warship Vasa from the mud at the bottom of Stockholm Harbour. It represents one of the greatest maritime archaeological recoveries ever carried out. After the salvage of the ship in 1961, it was conserved and restored and can be seen in a specially built museum where it has attracted millions of visitors over the years.

Posted in Ships

The wanderer at Kingstown and John Masefield

The Poet Laureate John Masefield was essentially a sea poet; the sea was what he knew and wrote about best. He we discuss his relationship with the Wander and that ships connection with Kingstown (now Dún Laoghaire)

Posted in Stories

The sinking of Arandora Star

The torpedoing of the Blue Star Line’s 15,000-ton luxury liner Arandora Star off Bloody Foreland, Donegal on 2 July 1940 is one of the hidden histories of Second World War Ireland. Though the sinking was reported in the local press in Mayo and Donegal, where it is still remembered, it never made it into the national consciousness due to wartime censorship.

Posted in War

Amity (1701) The Dunworley Slave Ship

The history of slavery is probably as old as that of mankind itself. Hundreds of thousands of slaves built such classical civilisations as Greece, Egypt and Rome. Viking Dublin was a major slave trading port in its heyday. However, for the purposes of this story I will deal only with the transatlantic slave trade whereby from twelve to twenty million African slaves were transported to the Americas over a span of four hundred years.

Posted in Ships

Crescent City

Mexican Silver Dollars at Galley Head, recovered from the cargo of the Crescent City

Posted in Ships

M.V. Kilkenny by Austin Gill

ID photo of Austin Gill

An account of the events of the night of 21st November 1991 Austin Gill, A.B., M.V. Kilkenny. The events of that night are still very vivid in my mind after more than 20 years although I often forget things that

Posted in Ships

Fethard Lifeboat Disaster.

need to transcribe ?

Posted in Ships

Maritime Art and Dún Laoghaire

Illustrated talk given to the Dún Laoghaire Borough Historical Society on Feb. 21st. 2007.

Posted in Stories

Moyalla Salvaged

The salvage of the valuable cargo of the Moyalla is the tale of triumph of a skilled first time salvor over the might of a large professional salvage company. It is a remarkable story of early scuba diving in Ireland and typical of salvage undertaken in the 1950s.

Posted in Engineering

1913 Mural at LBS Men’s Shed

On Saturday 14 September 2013 at 2pm

Unveiling of a mural of the 1913 lockout

at the LBS Men’s Shed, Click for details

Posted in news

1913 Mural at LBS Men’s Shed

On Saturday 14 September 2013 at 2pm

Unveiling of a mural of the 1913 lockout

at the LBS Men’s Shed, Click for details

Posted in news

Tayleur was lost at Lambay

The sailing ship Tayleur was lost at Lambay just north of Dublin on 21 January 1854. Of the 650 aboard only 290 survived, merely three of the hundred women survived and only three of fifty children reached shore. Known as the “First Titanic”

Posted in Stories

Pomona, emigrant ship, 389 died

it is out pitiful duty to record. The United States ship Pomona , Captain Merrihew with a crew of thirty five men and three hundred and seventy three passengers, principally Irish left Liverpool on Wednesday 27th instant, bound for New York, she struck the Blackwater Bank, at four o’clock a.m. on the following day. all on board , amounting to 389 souls – the crew and passengers making in the aggregate 408, out of whom only twenty three were saved. We have the above melancholy particulars of this dreadful disaster from the active and efficient agent of the Shipwrecked Mariners society

Posted in Stories

The Mystery of the Titanic

The Mystery of the Titanic

She was the largest ship in the world at the time
She was proclaimed unsinkable
She collided with an iceberg and sank on her maiden voyage.

Posted in Ships

SS Lochgarry

History of the SS Lochgarry
One of Ireland’s most Popular Recreational Diving Wrecks

Posted in Ships

Demeray

“The two barren islets are best remembered as the scene of the several shipwrecks. Here in 1819 the Demerary carrying gold bullion was wrecked and sank. One of her passengers, a Scotsman named Hugh Monro Robertson and sixteen members of the crew were washed ashore at Cullenstown and buried in the ancient graveyard in the Cill Park near Cullenstown Castle. Monroe’s is the only tombstone there now as one of the pillars from the memorial over the sailors’ grave was used as a weight on a harrow by a local farmer. To this day it is said that traces of gold dust from the Demerary’s strong room are found on the sand of the Keeraghs”

Posted in Ships

The Art of Diving by Nick Hanna

 The art of Diving   Nick Hanna with photos By Alexander Mustard     This is another of these books that make a novice say I want to get into that. A seasoned diver just says wow. The introduction sets out

Posted in Book Review

Objective

The Objective of this site is to support and promote research into Irish maritime history. Here we will publish articles, as well as identifying articles on other sites We will provide some material which may be of assistance to researchers

Posted in Uncategorized

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

Posted in Uncategorized

The Argentine Republic Emigration Scheme

This marked the end of Irish emigration to South America. It was badly planned and many died

Posted in Stories

Tram and schooner collide

Few stories have been mentioned so often with so much confusion than the tale of the collision between a sailing ship and a tram at Ringsend bridge. There have been several errors repeated and one discovery has been that there were two similar incidents at the same place. Earlier researchers have not had the advantage of the computer searchable versions of the digitised newspapers and this has helped resolve mysteries and tales such as this. The story gained interest when the visitor’s centre was constructed near the site of the accident. The story defied researchers who had hoped that a photo of the incident might be available for display.

Posted in Stories

Roman wrecks of Lake Nemi

There is a small lake called Nemi in the Alban Hills, about 30 kilometers southeast of Rome. Between 1927 and 1933, two enormous wooden ships, which once belonged to the Emperor Caligula, and had lain on the bottom of the Lake for over nineteen hundred years, were salvaged in what was perhaps the greatest underwater archaeological recovery ever accomplished.

Posted in Stories

The Guinness Fleets

The Guinness brewing concern had substantial maritime resources to support distribution of the famous beer. In addition the family spent a lot of their leisure on a range of fabulous pleasure craft. Initially the reach of the brewing concern expanded from 1790 thanks to the commencement of the Irish canal system. Barge transport enabled distribution of their beer from Dublin and import of malt from all parts of the country.

Posted in Stories

Tayleur Fund Medal Awards

The sailing ship Tayleur was wrecked in January 1854 at Lambay with the loss of 220 of the 670 aboard. A fund was established in both Liverpool and Dublin to assist the victims. The fund was used to award medals for heroism in the Irish Sea.

Posted in Stories

Salvage Tradition, Law and Lore

The fury with which primitive communities descended upon a stricken vessel can only be regarded with a sense of awe. Tales abound of the ferocity of wreckers and their cruel deeds. Many tales are related which must be apocryphal.

Posted in Stories

The Man of War Head: A Mystery Solved.

Man Of War in North County Dublin could be better described as a hamlet rather than a village. It consists today of a crossroads with a few houses and a pub, appropriately named the Man Of War Inn.

Posted in Stories

A Riddle of Sand- The Kish Bank

It is often said that there is too much ‘rubbish’ information on the web. To be sure, there is rubbish but there’s rubbish everywhere. There is certainly not so much that the internet should not be used for research. This would of course be foolish. Like all libraries of information, one must discriminate and discard and hone, until you arrive at what you believe to be the nearest to accurate you can reasonably achieve.

Posted in Engineering

The East India Company at Dundaniel

In attempting to give an account of the East India Company at Dundaniel and especially their iron works, it has been necessary, in the absence of information, to study other Irish and English iron smelters for the same period and then try to reconstruct what must have taken place at Dundaniel.

Posted in Engineering

The Dublin Port Diving Bell

bell

Posted in Engineering

Lost to Time and Tide

This article offers no conclusions or answers, and is only designed to record some unusual archaeological features within a beautiful bay, which seem to have been forgotten and their use gone unrecorded. One wonders, just how old they are? Suggestions please.

Posted in Engineering

A History of Diving in Ireland

While there were few diving inventors or innovators in Ireland, it is remarkable that many of the early diving pioneers worked around the Irish coast. Local entrepreneurs and salvors were quick to exploit the invention of the helmet in the early 19th century and rapidly took on salvage work on their own account.

Posted in Engineering

Dublin Shipyards

Notes on Shipbuilding on the Liffey

Posted in Engineering

Concrete Ships

During the First world war a shortage of steel developed as replacements were being built for the huge tonnage sunk by submarines. Steel was prioritised for construction of warships. Late in the war the USA envisaged a fleet of concrete ships but few were completed before the war ended.

Posted in Engineering

Morven Disaster. December, 1906.

The Morven was bound from Portland, Oregon to Liverpool with a cargo of about three thousand tons of grain for the Messrs Bannatyne. The place where the wreck occurred is a little promontory locally known as “Horse Island”.

Posted in Ships

M.V. Plassy

Plassy

The Plassy is the wreck shown in the opening sequence of Fr Ted. Behind it is a real story of a heroic rescue.

Posted in Ships

The Wreck of the Bolivar

The Country had been in the grip of freezing conditions for the entire month of February 1947 with snowstorms, and accompanying snowdrifts, which blanketed the countryside and made all movement extremely difficult. Power failures were frequent and added to the general misery. It was against this background that the M.V.BOLIVAR was making her way across the Irish Sea on the morning of Tuesday, March 4th, bound for Dublin Port with a badly needed cargo of grain and other essential items. Like many another fine ship before her, although Dublin Bay was in sight, the BOLIVAR would never reach that port and would leave her bones in the sands of that treacherous graveyard of ships that spans the entrance to Dublin Bay waiting to ensnare the unwary, the Kish Bank.

Posted in Ships

Skerries a maritime town and the Maritime Economy

Buss Bar Skerries, 8.00 all welcome

Posted in Uncategorized

MV Killarney

The MV Killarney formerly a liner tender and excursion boat at Cork has been converted into a bar and restaurant now moored at Dublin Docks.

Posted in Endangered

Pibroch

The Pibroch lies at the pier in Letterfrack Co Galway.   She is a later type of vessel than the typical Clyde Puffer having been built to carry whisky. The vessel has deteriorated beyond economical repair and has large holes in

Posted in Endangered

Mary Stanford

Mary Stanford, the Ballycotton Lifeboat renowened for the Daunt Lightship rescue, in Grand Canal Dock.

Posted in Endangered

Creteboon

The Creteboon was one of a number of concrete vessels built during the first world war at Carlingford Lough.   The creteboon was brought to the Moy estury in the 1930s with the purpose of being used as a blockship to

Posted in Endangered

Naomh Eanna

The former Aran Islands ferry once owned by CIE is administered by the Nautical Trust and used as floating shops at Hannover Dock in Dublin. )

Posted in Endangered

Port Lairge

(photo By Tony Brennan) Built in Dublin Dockyard the port Lairge was the Waterford port dredger for nearly a hundred years before she was abandoned nearly 20 years ago in  a wexford backwater.  The ship was powered by steam and

Posted in Endangered
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